Why is Dual GST required in india

By | September 29, 2016

Q . What type of GST is proposed to be implemented?

Ans. It would be a dual GST with the Centre and States simultaneously levying it on a common tax base. The GST to be levied by the Centre on intra-State supply of goods and / or services would be called the Central GST (CGST) and that to be levied by the States would be called the State GST (SGST). Similarly Integrated GST (IGST) will be levied and administered by Centre on every inter-state supply of goods and services.

Q . Why is Dual GST required?

Ans. India is a federal country where both the Centre and the States have been assigned the powers to levy and collect taxes through appropriate legislation. Both the levels of Government have distinct responsibilities to perform according to the division of powers prescribed in the Constitution for which they need to raise resources. A dual GST will, therefore, be in keeping with the Constitutional requirement of fiscal federalism.

Q . Which authority will levy and administer GST?

Ans. Centre will levy and administer CGST & IGST while respective states will levy and administer SGST.

Q . Why was the Constitution of India amended recently in the context of GST?

Ans. Currently, the fiscal powers between the Centre and the States are clearly demarcated in the Constitution with almost no overlap between the respective domains. The Centre has the powers to levy tax on the manufacture of goods (except alcoholic liquor for human consumption, opium, narcotics etc.) while the States have the powers to levy tax on the sale of goods. In the case of inter-State sales, the Centre has the power to levy a tax (the Central Sales Tax) but, the tax is collected and retained entirely by the States. As for services, it is the Centre alone that is empowered to levy service tax.

Introduction of the GST required amendments in the Constitution so as to simultaneously empower the Centre and the States to levy and collect this tax. The Constitution of India has been amended by the Constitution (one hundred and first amendment) Act, 2016 recently for this purpose. Article 246A of the Constitution empowers the Centre and the States to levy and collect the GST.

Q  How a particular transaction of goods and services would be taxed simultaneously under Central GST (CGST) and State GST (SGST)?

Ans. The Central GST and the State GST would be levied simultaneously on every transaction of supply of goods and services except the exempted goods and services, goods which are outside the purview of GST and the transactions which are below the prescribed threshold limits. Further, both would be levied on the same price or value unlike State VAT which is levied on the value of the goods inclusive of CENVAT. While the location of the supplier and the recipient within the country is immaterial for the purpose of CGST, SGST would be chargeable only when the supplier and the recipient are both located within the State.

Illustration I: Suppose hypothetically that the rate of CGST is 10% and that of SGST is 10%. When a wholesale dealer of steel in Uttar Pradesh supplies steel bars and rods to a construction company which is also located within the same State for, say Rs. 100, the dealer would charge CGST of Rs. 10 and SGST of Rs. 10 in addition to the basic price of the goods. He would be required to deposit the CGST component into a Central Government account while the SGST portion into the account of the concerned State Government Of course, he need not actually pay Rs. 20 (Rs. 10 + Rs. 10) in cash as he would be entitled to set-off this liability against the CGST or SGST paid on his purchases (say, inputs). But for paying CGST he would be allowed to use only the credit of CGST paid on his purchases while for SGST he can utilize the credit of SGST alone. In other words, CGST credit cannot, in general, be used for payment of SGST. Nor can SGST credit be used for payment of CGST.

Illustration II: Suppose, again hypothetically, that the rate of CGST is 10% and that of SGST is 10%. When an advertising company located in Mumbai supplies advertising services to a company manufacturing soap also located within the State of Maharashtra for, let us say Rs. 100, the ad company would charge CGST of Rs. 10 as well as SGST of Rs. 10 to the basic value of the service. He would be required to deposit the CGST component into a Central Government account while the SGST portion into the account of the concerned State Government. Of course, he need not again actually pay Rs. 20 (Rs. 10+Rs. 10) in cash as it would be entitled to set-off this liability against the CGST or SGST paid on his purchase (say, of inputs such as stationery, office equipment, services of an artist etc). But for paying CGST he would be allowed to use only the credit of CGST paid on its purchase while for SGST he can utilise the credit of SGST alone. In other words, CGST credit cannot, in general, be used for payment of SGST. Nor can SGST credit be used for payment of CGST.

Education Guide on Goods & Service Tax (GST)


 

S. No. Title of the Post
1. Goods and Services Tax (GST): An Overview
2 Levy of GST & Exemption from Tax
3. GST Registration
4. Meaning and Scope of Supply
5 Time of Supply
6 Valuation in GST
7. GST Payment of Tax
8 Electronic Commerce under Goods & Service Tax (GST)
9 Job Work under Goods & Service Tax (GST)
10 Input Tax Credit under Goods & Service Tax (GST)
11 Concept of Input Service Distributor in Goods & Service Tax (GST)
12 Returns Process and matching of Input Tax Credit under GST
13 Assessment and Audit under GST
14 Refund under GST
15 Demands and Recovery under GST
16 Appeals, Review and Revision in GST
17 Advance Ruling in Goods and Service Tax (GST)
18 Settlement Commission in Goods and Service Tax (GST)
19 Inspection, Search, Seizure and Arrest under GST
20 Offences, Penalty, Prosecution & Compounding in GST
21 Integrated Goods & Service Tax (IGST) Act Overview
22. Place of Supply of Goods and Service under GST
23. Frontend Business Process on GST Portal
24. Transitional Provisions in Goods & Service Tax (GST)

 

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